Opioid Addicton

Why Are Opiates So Addictive?

Why Are Opiates So Addictive?

Opiates are notorious for their addictive qualities and the impact they have on people who become dependent on them. Opium and its derivatives have been a part of human history for more than 3000 years. According to the National Institute of Mental Health, it wasn’t until 1806 that the active ingredient in opium was first isolated. It was named morphine, after the ancient Greek god of sleep and dreams. (1) That marked the beginning of humanity’s complex pharmacological relationship with opioid compounds.

What Is Naloxone Used For?

What Is Naloxone Used For?

Narcan (naloxone) is a nasal spray that serves an opioid antagonist and an anti-overdose solution. In the event of an overdose on opioids such as heroin or fentanyl, prompt administration of naloxone cancels the effects of the overdose by replacing opioids active on the receptors in the brain and prevents more opioids from binding.

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate Withdrawal Timeline

Opiate and opioid drugs, including prescription narcotics and illegal substances like heroin, can produce withdrawal symptoms with a few hours after the last dose, and symptoms can last for up to a week or longer. Withdrawal is not typically life-threatening, but without medical intervention, it is likely to result in a relapse.

The Dangers of Fentanyl Addiction

The Dangers of Fentanyl Addiction

Fentanyl addiction can occur when a person repeatedly abuses fentanyl, and this can happen after being prescribed by a physician or after having obtained it illicitly on the street. Fentanyl abuse and addiction can lead to severe emotional, physical, and social consequences, and can rapidly result in an overdose.

What Does Fentanyl Look Like?

What Does Fentanyl Look Like?

Fentanyl is an opioid and prescription painkiller that is available as a pill, powder, tablet, spray, or sublingual (under the tongue) film. Time-release formulas of fentanyl are found as gel patches or lollipops, and hospitals sometimes use injectable forms. Illicit street versions of fentanyl are usually in powder form.

How Long Does Methadone Stay in Your System?

How Long Does Methadone Stay in Your System?

How Long Does Methadone Stay in Your System? – Methadone has a half-life of between 8-59 hours, which is the time it takes for half the dose to be cleared from the system. It takes about five half-lives for a drug to leave the body entirely. Therefore, methadone can potentially stay in a person’s system for as long as 12 days.

Dangers of Using Opioids and Potentiators

Dangers of Using Opioids and Potentiators

Dangers of Using Opioids and Potentiators – Opioids are drugs used for pain relief that include both prescription medications and illegal drugs. Examples of prescription opioids are oxycodone and hydrocodone, and examples of illegal opioids are heroin and illicit fentanyl. Potentiators are substances that are used to intensify the effects of opioids.