Alcohol Addiction

What is Considered Alcohol Abuse?

What is Considered Alcohol Abuse?

Social norms with regard to alcohol have evolved over the last 30 years. Drinking to excess has always had consequences, but it was considered more socially acceptable in the past. As we’ve become more health-conscious the expectations for accountability are higher when it comes to alcohol abuse.

When Should You Seek Mental Health Treatment?

The Long-Term Effects of Alcoholism

We have known for centuries that excess alcohol consumption has dire consequences for human health. Prior to the early 20th century, the phenomenon of alcoholism had undergone only a little study and was largely a mystery. What we did know was that people who drank a lot often suffered serious health problems, especially later in life. More recently, science has been studying not only the long-term effects of alcoholism on the body but also the brain.

Women’s Healthcare Month: How Addiction Affects Women Differently

Women’s Healthcare Month: How Addiction Affects Women Differently

In the past, men reported higher rates of addiction and substance use disorder than women, but in the past few decades women have swiftly closed the gender gap. Today, men and women experience roughly equal rates of these issues. However, women’s rates of progression, experiences, reasons for use, and stigmas can vary greatly from their male counterparts. 

Substance Abuse Rates Are Higher in the LGBTQ Community

Substance Abuse Rates Are Higher in the LGBTQ Community

Tobacco has always been said to be a gateway into heavier alcohol, drug and substance use among the teens. This was proven in 2007, when a study at Columbia University found that the nicotine in tobacco products poses a significant risk of structural and chemical changes in developing brains. These changes actually put teens at greater risk of developing addictions to alcohol and drugs.